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for good evening. our conversation on the life and legacy of martin luther king junior. we will talk with two of the three surviving children. martinalways regarded luther king as the greatest american this country has ever and his is a legacy of and prophetice witness. he was a man not willing to settle. you joined us. athe legacy of martin luther king is coming up now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: we are joined by the director of the king institute. i guess today officially concludes the festivities that have been going on for weeks. what is your sense for how martin has been treated? >> i think it has been great. i think that represents that martin luther king's legacy lives on into the 21st century. >> we have a problem where the majority do not have passports. not get out and see the world. see inside looking out. when one does travel around the world, give me some sense of how is regardedr king around the world. >> you have asked the right question. he is a world figure. he is a symbol for social justice around the world. o
over to the side? martin luther king. in fact, i think we have the speaking program from august 28, 1963. i think we can put this up. there you go. number 16 in order, somebody named reverend dr. martin luther king jr. robert, that was -- we're going to get to king a little later. we intentionally not talked about him for now for this precise point, that until he stood on the steps of lincoln monument and made that speech, he was not going to be the star of the day. in fact, i think "the washington post" the day after, like in their 16 reports the day after the march, didn't really -- didn't do a story on martin luther king's speech. that wasn't supposed to be what people were there to hear. >> a lot of people missed it. although i went back the other day and looked at the coverage the associated press did in new orleans, for example. and king's speech, while it was completely absent from the pages of "the washington post," was on the front page of the new orleans times pacayne. i think up to that point the real story was not the speakers, although they were important and was not g
. they want me to speak on martin luther king day and the gett gettysburg affair as well. he wants to speak about this moment about important issues facing african-americans and all americans at this moment. >> as we watch these scenes from washington, d.c. we forget the incredible history of the man for whom the monument was made himself, lincoln himself. he felt he bombed the, gett gettysburg address because the man before him had spoken so long and eloquently. >> because barack obama face this is tremendous moment in history where we have this bench march, the election of the nation's first black president, but at the same time the roll back request the supreme court ruling and shelby county, and so forth. this is to look at how far we've come as a society. 50 years ago when dr. martin luther king with his dream and it seems thoug as though thingsn jeopardy. >> mike, it is not lost on anybody in this room how lucky we are because the umbrellas are out, and you are in the rain. >> reporter: well of course our textcal crew has provided me with an umbrella, and you can't see it. it is raini
of events will be held to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. martin luther king delivered his famous i have a dream speech. from coast-to-coast, there are many murals bearing king's image. one photographer has spent the last 30 years traveling across america to discover how dr. king is portrayed by artists on the street. this is what he found. >> the images bear witness to their tremendous resilience and tremendous popularity of dr. king. while some of the other figures may fall down the wayside. martin luther king is always present. you had martin luther king very often with nelson mandela and with malcolm x. that was very common in the 90's. in los angeles, the company kept company with people like poncho via or cesar chavez. the first thing was the most amazing one, that was in los angeles and that had to do with martin luther king being painted by a commercial painter, sign painters that had actually never painted a black person before. there were also latinos. sometimes, you could only recognize them because they .rote mlk sometimes i would have to knock on the door o
photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, that is how president obama has described the alleged chemical attack outside of damascus earlier this week. the british foreign secretary has said in no uncertain terms that his government leaves that syrian regime attacked its own people. even russia has joined calls for leading you when inspectors investigate. letting you when .nvestigators in >> treating the injured from the alleged chemical attack in the damascus suburbs. adults and children, frantic medical workers. still unverified, but this new footage is from a syrian filmmaker. more tales of what exactly happened in a small hours of wednesday morning. of myfather, mother, all sisters and brothers come at least 50 neighbors collapse on the floor. i managed to bring my little sisters to the hospital. nothing is left. cars hittingw walls because the drivers lost consciousness as they tried to transport the victims for treatment.
on washington, 50 years later people around the country reflect on martin luther king's dream. >> well to al jazeera, we're just days away from the 50th anniversary of that famous "i have a dream" speech. people are make thinking way to washington, d.c. thousands of people in fact, and our del walters is there talking to people about why it's so important for them to relive history, and how far have we come and how much further do we have to go? >> reporter: hey, richelle, what it is is a day of soaring temperatures and rhetoric on the mall much like it must have been 50 years ago. i watched it at home with my family as did hundreds of thousands african-americans or as we were called back then, negro or colored, and then blacks or african-americans. the crowds stretch from the lincoln memorial down to the moment. which is a distance of a mile. they started coming at 7:00 and they began to trickle to a sea of humanity that is now engaged in a familiar theme, and that is change has to come to washington. change has to come to america. that was the theme echoed some 50 years ago. one who spoke
where the 34-year-old reverend martin luther king jr. already renowned as an author and freedom rights leader was to make the speech of his life. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. >> reporter: the reverend cecil williams of glide memorial church was there. >> i just said, something exciting is really taking place today. because there were just hoards of people. i mean people coming from every direction. and i was so proud to be a part of it. it was -- i had never seen that many people before in my life. it was the forum and the movement and the energy and the commitment and spirit of the people. >> many of them had never stood even in a line where there were black and white people together. you would never know that there was any feeling of hostility or anything. it was such a beautiful spirit that existed that day. >> reporter: martin luther king knew that his speech had to reach out beyond the immediate crowd to touch the hearts of people everywhe
of the campaign for jobs back 50 years ago that martin luther king led. jobs. i think that's how the standard is going to be set for his speech tonight. will he promise something really, really big that the republicans will have a hard time saying no to? or will he say no to himself? i think that's the worst possible thing you can do today is say no to himself and hesitate, be too prudent, and not offer a big proposal. otherwise, he's going to end his second term with the unemployment rate roughly the same as the one he inherited. that's not a good record for a democratic president. >> but chris, let me ask you this. the president has been on this jobs tour and talking about his effort to get people back to work. but living in this moment, in this time, we said oprah winfrey is perhaps the personification of dr. king's dream, but we know that the first african-american president is that. regardless of policy or the politics that happens in that tough town that you love so well, the emotion of seeing that is something that cannot be disputed through any fact. it is the reality that he is the f
but says talks could take several days more. >> the united states marks 50 years since martin luther king's famous speech. >> the un's secretary-general is calling on the u.s. am a britain, and france to live weapons inspectors more time to do their work in syria. after discussions today, russia called the british initiative premature. >> the u.s. says it has intercepted communications that prove the assad government was behind a chemical attack. but the syrian ambassador to the united nations denies the charges and says the u.n. inspection will prove it was in fact rebels who launched gas attacks. >> meanwhile, people in damascus are stocking up on supplies out of fears that any u.s. attack would hit civilian areas. >> the u.n. inspectors have resumed their work in a damascus suburb, determining if chemical weapons were used in an attack last week. u.n. and arab league special envoy says their investigation had up 30 -- had already produced onekey piece of evidence. >> it does seem that some kind of substance was used that killed a lot of people. hundreds, maybe more than hundreds. some
decision. y se cumplen 50 aÑos del discurso de martin luther king. >>> y en mÉxico el hallazgo de la vÍctima nÚmero 13 podrÍa llevar al autor de la masacre del bar heaven. y maduro vuelve a provocar criticas de su pueblo por confundir un pasaje de la biblia. comenzamos. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> este es su "noticiero univisiÓn" con jorge ramos y marÍa elena salinas. ♪ >>> quÉ tal, buenas noches. estarÁn estados unidos y sus aliados al borde de una nueva guerra? todo parece indicar que un ataque castigo contra siria es inminente, pero se consideran factores polÍticos y diplomÁticos, la onu pide mas tiempo para completar investigaciÓn. y el mientras el mundo se pone de acuerdo el pueblo sirio sigue sufriendo por el embate de su gobierno. >>> la violencia en siria no para desde que conocieron las primeras imÁgenes del ataque con armas quÍmicas, estados unidos no tiene dudas que se usÓ armas quÍmicas, los misiles esperan la orden de ataque del presidente obama. son 4 buques con lanzamisiles que atacarÍan puntos estratÉgicos, la misiva podrÍa ser apoyada por aviones bombarder
years ago today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes,
. as martin luther king paved the way for an african-american president, this man i guess sort of hit the skids. virginia's former democratic governor with us. governor, it's a real pleasure to have you. >> neil, good to be with you. >> you talk about this sort of weird juxtaposition between looking at the advancement and improvement we've made on things like racial equality, but not when it comes to just economic quality and the president himself mentioned it and said this is something party and generations have done. what is it that we can't budge? first of all, king's dream was based on the opportunity made available for people to live the american dream. consequently, the key at that time for all persons involved with the civil rights leadership was education. he felt if you could unlock the door, it would open other doors to advancement. unfortunately in today's economy, we find too many unemployed african-americans. we find too many instances and too many kids dropping out of school. we find too much violence in the communities. we find less parental involvement and we find comm
but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> fifty years after martin luther king's most famous speech, americans descend on the nation's capitol to keep his dream alive. >>> california's wildfire raging out of control and moving further into yosemite national park, the fire so menacing, a state of alert has been declared by governor jar brown. for san francisco, the flames are tearing through acres of pristine woodlands. the fear is that million dollars of people in northern camera could lose their water and power. yosemite is on the eastern side of the state, almost 190 miles from san francisco. but most of the bay area's water and power flow right through that area. kilmany duchardt has more. >> it's the fastest moving wildfire in the west if he hfed the fire itself. at risk, the grid and water supply some 150 miles away. >> it has affected our water and power system. >> reporter: two of three hydroelectric powerhouses that supply energy to this city have been shut down to keep fire fighters safe. the city now getting back-up energy from pacific gas and electric. the 165 squa
negro spiritual declairing the dream of the young martin luther king, jr. 50 years later, the son of that king has called us all together once again to gather at the feet of the great emancipator just wonder from the granite figure of his father and one of our founding fathers. he has called us together not just to celebrate nor merely to commemorate. he has called us to fortify and inknock late our human spirit to galvanize and energyize our collective consciences to take action to realize the dream. he has been an elected leader, the president of a southern christian leader conference, the head of the martin luther king jr. center for nonviolent social change, the founder of realizing the dream. he is a national civil rights champion, a global human rights crusader. he is the father of yo landa renee, the husband of andrew waters, the big brother of dexter and bern niece, the younger brother of the late dwro landa denees. born of cortea scott king and the namesake of dr. martin luther king, jr., ladies and gentlemen, martin luther king iii. five decades ago, my father dr. martin
, the principles of freedom and justice for all. that we have today whatsident who understands martin luther king meant when he said, we must rise up from the basement of race and color to the higher ground of content of character. i am glad we have a president who joins with martin luther king in calling upon this nation to rise up and leave the basement of race and color and come to the higher ground of content of character. for a nationayer that is strangely enough continuing to seek to deny rights and restrict read him -- freedom and the right to vote. later, it isyears even stranger that there are men and forces who still seek to restrict our vote and deny our full participation. washingtonme here to to say, we ain't going back. we ain't going back. we have come too far. prayed to hardg, , wept too utterly, bled too profusely, and died too young to let anybody turn back the clock on our turning to justice. [applause] the for the -- thank you for the privilege of sharing these moments with you. i see a man walking out on the stage signaling my time is up. god bless you and god keep you, hang
on washington, new civil rights leaders descend on the lincoln memorial where martin luther king, jr. once told us he had a dream. >> come on, let's go! >>> the fast-moving wildfire that has consumed 165 square miles has entered yosemite national park. and having doubled in size in just one day, it's now bearing down on thousands of structures. >>> she was tried, convicted and monday she'll be back in court. now jane velez-mitchell reveals new details about jodi arias that show how a previous boyfriend may have narrowly escaped her clutches. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm brianna kheiler. >> and i'm ivan watson. it's 10:00 p.m. on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. and you're in the cnn newsroom. >> let freedom ring. >> and we begin this hour with history being made again today in the nation's capital. >> that's right. marchers are retracing the landmark 1963 march on washington. it was 50 years ago wednesday that the reverend martin luther king, jr. called for an end to hatred and bigotry in his "i have a dream" speech. >> chris is on the mall. chris, participants are exchanging words, but the
celebrate a key moment in our nation's history. his speech that echoed martin luther king junior's speech. >>> things are going to warm up. how warm will it be in your city tomorrow? i'll have the details. . >>> they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who long for freedom, and whites what can no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the segregation of others. >> president obama on the mall today pay be tribute to dr. martin luther king junior and all those who marched 50 years ago. thousands participated in today's celebration, and it not only noted the progress but the ground that yet needs to be traveled. >> bells rang out at the exact hour martin luther king's dream sang out. >> president obama, the nation's first black president, standing exactly where dr. king stood reflecting on the progress and the work that remains. >> no one can match king's brilliant, but the same flame that lit the heart of all who are willing to take the first step for justice. i know that flame remains. >> and other times, focusing on o
electronic army says it carried out the attack. the march of martin luther king, , was 50 years ago. understanding how our brains develop and function is one of the biggest challenges in medical science. grown aarchers have brain fragment and are hoping it could have huge benefits. our medical correspondent has more. >> this is the closest science has gotten to building a human brain. this shows the layers of the organ. they did not complete an entire organ but rather tiny fragments. they reprogrammed them to form brain cells. that has been done before in a dish, but they went further. they were nourished in a bioreactor and began forming 3-d structures. brains reached a similar a ninef development as week old fetus but were not capable of thought. nonetheless, the research has astounded neuroscientists. >> it is starting to look like your brain and starting to show behaviors of a tiny brain. it is extraordinary. >> how will it help medicine? it will increase our understanding of brain disorders like schizophrenia or autism and may also help test drug treatment. scientists in edinbu
theocracy whir watching this commemoration of dr. martin luther king, jr.'s march for jobs and freedom here 50 years ago today. i'm here of course with "hardball" anchor and reporter today chris matthews. chris, we've been listening to the speeches and watching and thinking about what happened here 50 years ago. it resonates for you? >> i have to tell you so far today the best part has been andrew young. andrew young is an older guy. like me, maybe. he brought some joy to the occasion today. i think -- what's remarkable about today, the "new york times" wrote the most extraordinary -- >> it was the best explanation of what the speech itself meant. she wrote about the fact that reverend king was son, the grandson and great-grandson of a baptist preacher. the i have a dream is in response from mahalia jackson. >> and all of that is a continuity going all the way back to the declaration of independence through the proclamation proclam ation -- proclamation emancipation and the sweltering summer of discontent. the poetry of martin luther king. >> the speech started as prose and was an economic
and racial equality, where we stand 50 years after martin luther king, jr.'s iva dream spee >> good to have you with us. there may be more evidence of what appears to be a chemical weapons attack last week in damaskas. three hospitals supported by the international humanitarian group say victims started pouring in wednesday exhibiting neuro toxic symptoms. medical staff say they treated 3600 patients in a time span of just three hours of those patients, medics say 355 people died. wednesday night's attack has prompted president obama to discuss potential military options in syria. the new president of the syrian national coalition has called for an international military intervention in syria. the syrian government denies it launched the attack and has released this footage right here. state tv says at this evidence after chemical attack. earlier today we spoke with sophie delaney in new york. she described what medical staff in syria have been seeing. >> the symptom with -- been reported about are symptoms including some blurred vision, some headaches, and in the most severe cases, some co
will speak on the steps of the lincoln memorial, where martin luther king delivered his i have a dream speech. >> i have a dream, that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. [ cheers and applause ] >> i have a dream -- >> thousands are heading to the capitol to attend the rally. robert ray is joining some of those travelers on the road from tallahassee. >> reporter: good morning, richelle. a very steamy morning here. i feel like perhaps i should be dressed like these folks with t-shirts on. a they are stopping here for a quick break, and inspired by martin luther king. and one gentlemen i was talking to earlier, if you could come in here, sir. >> how are you doing. >> reporter: this is a member of the marine corps, inspired to come on this bus. why? >> well, i mean, i want to be a part of history. you can't forget, 50 years ago, martin luther king, the things that he did, and also john fkennedy right after that. and this is a part of history that i would like to relive. >> reporter:
at the steps of the lincoln memorial. al sharpton, martin luther king iii, reverend jackson. stay with us. >>> a moan tuesday occasion on beautiful clear day in our nation's capital. right now thousands of people marching from the lincoln memorial to the martin luther king jr. memorial before ending their march at the washington monument. marking 50 years since hundreds of thousands of americans descend order the national mall to hear the reverend dr. martin luther king deliver one of the most famous speeches in american history. some of the thousands in washington were actually there on august 28, 1963. as we take a look at the scenes from 50 years ago and many on hand today who weren't even born yet. all celebrating the great strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implica
. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestimating the crowd sizes by other groups. this is a huge crowd. i can say that for sure. easily over 100,000 people. we're at 15 and independence now. the route of the parade will come this way, toward the camera. but there are still tens of thousands of people moving in the other direction toward the lincoln memori
and published an ad calling on dr. martin luther king to stop the protests, to work inside the system and stop organizing these demonstrations. to stop being the outside agitator, he responded with a letter from the birmingham jail which he wrote longhand in the margins of the newspaper in which he was able to read the ad and read the stories of his fellow ministers criticizing his tactics. his arrest was one component of a big activist plan for birmingham that year. birmingham was seen as being among the most impossible places for progress. it was the most stubborn, the most violent, the most rigidly opposed to desegregation. the plan was to push there in one of the worst places notice country. and see what happened. see how they responded to pressure. and after what they thought was a slow start of sit-ins and protests in the first eight days a total of 150 people had been arrested and taken to jail, that sounds like a lot, but for the time it was disappointingly low, after that, what they perceived to be a slow start in birmingham, on april 12th, dr. king was arrested himself, and 50 others
the entire, i have a dream speech by dr. martin luther king, jr. that. before kevin finally came home and the first grandchild arrived, before the sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, and brad's brief brush with the law... man: smile. before the second british invasion... before katie, debbie, kevin, and brad... before they became a family, there was a connection that started it all and made the future the wonderful thing it turned out to be. we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. >>> the following limited commercial presentation is made possible by bank of america. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, worki
. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city. we will be able to speed up that day with all of god's children, black men and white men, jews and gentiles, protestants and catholic, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old knnegro spiritual, freet last, free at last, thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> to think the most famous part of the speech was ad libbed. at this hour, thousands are retracing the steps of the original marchers heading down constitution avenue to the washington memorial and the national mall. two hours from now, a program commemorating the march and the speech will begin. then some time after 2:00, president obama and former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter will speak on the steps of t
remember the lasting words actions of dr. martin luther king on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. [ bell ] >> martin luther king's relatives rang a bell oakoing the words let freedom ring from the i have a dream speech. he gave the speech on this day in 1963 after the march that drew 250,000 people. >> america became more free and more fair. not just for african americans but for women and latinos, asians, native americans. for catholics, jews, muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. >> tens of thousands stood in the rain for today's ceremonies that included a wreath laying. ktvu's mike mibach is in oakland where some say there is a lung way to go before martin luther king dream of equality is fulfilled. he has it claims of racial bias when it comes to arrests of young people in oakland. >> reporter: martin luther king taught equality 50 years ago and here we are racial profiling still being discussed across america and today in oakland. >>> there is the sound of students. >> i have a dream. >> the sound of king. >> little black boys and little black gir
from my alma mater, morehouse college when i was a student there. martin luther king, jr., was my mentor and jail mate. he taught only one class in his lifetime, and that was at morehouse the semesters of 1961, '62, a seminar in social philosophy. when i sat at his feet, one thing that impressed me most about his lectures was one concept that was advanced by dr. black man at boston university, of personalism. that idea that all persons in this crusted earth are important, are endued with worth and dignity. and in a government of civil society, we should accord all peoples, those services and amenities that will enable them to develop as fully matured persons. unfortunately, friends, because of the dark past of this nation, not too often african americans have experienced receiving those services that should have been ours which are [speaker not understood] and afforded for all american citizens. i wish to say that it's good for us to go back in history sometime and get a perspective. i have here a copy of some copious notes from a meeting that was held in savannah, georgia, januar
. here in washington, talk of war and peace at the lincoln memorial where martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military attack against syria as early as this week over its use of chemical weapons. tonight the pentagon says the u.s. military is ready to attack but in an interview this evening president obama says he has not made a decision to order a military strike. and new pressure on the president. the speaker of the house is demanding he make the case for any military action against syria. we want to begin our coverage with nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in our washington newsroom. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. diplomacy came to a dead end at the united nations when the russians again blocked any action against syria. but tonight the president faces a new political challenge as y
delivered by martin luther king. >> the clock is now ticking on u.s. military action in syria. a probably strike could come within days. u.s. warships are already in position, and the rest of the world is joining the debate on what kind of action should be taken and when. patty tells us what options president obama is weighing to stop the use of chemical weapo weapons. >> reporter: the president obama administration said they will respond to this, the use of chemical weapons in syria. the goal is not to remove bashir al-assad, but to send him a message. >> it is not our intention t for scream changregime change. >> reporter: many feel a strike is unlikely to shift momentum in syria. >> in terms of shifting the momentum on the ground, it's not likely. target strikes are nor powerful in terms of the signally that they achievish and sending a very strong message that the u.s. of chemical weapons will not be tolerated. >> reporter: many believe the president left himself little choice but to response. this was one year ago. >> a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical wea
martin luther king on the mall. here he sits with presidents of the united states so appropriately. we have a day set aside as a national holiday to celebrate his birthday. but he would want us to celebrate him, his birth and his legacy by acting upon his agenda, by realizing the dream, by making the minimum wage a living wage, by having not just family and medical leave, but paid sick leave for our workers, by having quality affordable child care so that our families can be -- the power of women can be unleashed in our economy and in our society. and do you know what? this just happens to be women's equality weekend. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago
" speech, remembering dr. martin luther king. >>> an army doctor turned killer facing military justice and a jury who will decide if he lives or dies. ♪ >>> we continue to follow the developments that are coming out of syria at this hour. at this hour, that is the syrian ambassador to the united nations addressing the security council there which is meeting to determine what to do next. >> all of the details related to this situation. i am in your hands. >> reporter: do you want the team to find out -- assign responsibility for the incidents? and when did angela kaine request to visit guda? there seems to be some disparity there? they are saying there was a five-day delay. >> mr. angela kaine concluded an agreement with the syrian government with regard to her visit, and the visit was granted. she was granted with her team to to go to the locations where the chemical -- where the allegations of the use of chemical weapons -- are there. so there were -- there were no delay whatsoever, and she was granted access to the locations that she and the other doctor wanted to visit. >> reporte
conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would change? >> there was but i think it had -- that had a lot to do with the expectations of the people of my parents' generation they had of us. and you know, also, a lot of black fathers gone -- were in world war ii and they went to fight for democracy and they came back and still had segregation and a lot of discrimination. so they expected us to be that generation that would change things. but i think if there was one symbol, that we al
yosemite national park. >>> plus, it has been 50 years since martin luther king, jr. made his famous "i have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we
york city, this is "nightline" with cynthia mcfadden. >>> good evening, when martin luther king jr. stood up to address the nation on the steps of the lincoln memorial, his words did not use the phrase "i have a dream." he had used those words before, but they wanted something different. and then, mahalia jackson said "tell them about the dream." and he said the words that still resonate today. two young african american girls went to the gathering, and had a message. today, they talk about what has changed and what has not. >> ♪ ♪ >> with songs and symbols from the struggle, a new generation of the faithful. >> and we thank the mighty god for giving us a martin luther king, we thank the mighty god who brought us a long way, from disgrace to amazing grace. >> the famous? >> he challenged us to see how we are all more alike than we are different. >> the powerful stood before the lincoln memorial. >> the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. that we are masters of our fate. but it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will on
ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sublime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and exuding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the time the reverend spoke having already lef
. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we go. >> 50 years ago today, martin luther king jr. dared to publicly dream that one day in alabama, little black boys and little black girls would be able to go hand in hand together with little white boys and little white girls as brothers and sisters. but he did not dare to publicly dream that one day a little black boy woul
>>> 50 years after dr. martin luther king told hundreds of thousands he had a dream. the first black president will remember king's live and legacy standing in almost the very same spot at the lincoln memorial as we look at that live right now. president obama will be joined by former presidents clinton and carter and celebrity rights and leaders as well. 50 years after one of the greatest speeches in political history, the president is expected to touch on the very same themes of justice and equality and opportunity. he will praise how far we have come but acknowledge how far we have left to go. perhaps he'll take a page from dr. king's book and transform words we have heard so many times into something unforgettable. "my country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee i sing. land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." >> let freedom ring. the theme for today's event as the president prepares for this speech, he'll also be juggling everything else that is going on around the world. topping that list is syria. it ap
. many of our civil rights leaders, including my husband and dr. martin luther king, were still of an age when they took the lead. with that question and mind, i challenge you to get back to community building. it is your problem, it is our problem, it is our neighborhood. these are our children, you are the parents. but in that same breath, and victory will be a collective one. it is with a clear conscience, knowing what we have done and can do, that we will reach that mountaintop, and we will overcome. but it will take each and every one of us, in unity, in unison, letting those who say that they managed this country of america know that it is the people. it is the voice and the actions of the people that say, we must overcome, and eventually say, we have overcome, because of the involvement of each and everyone. that is our challenge today. let us move for and do what we must do, remembering freedom is not free. we must work for it. [applause] >> peaceful coexistence was a hallmark of dr. king's teachings. he said we must learn to get to live as brothers or perish as fools. welcome the
an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is why i think it is very important congress observe this anniversary and what followed. there were signs of progress but not enough. at the time of the march, there were five african-american members at th
coverage of the 50th anniversary of martin luther king jr.'s iconic "i have a dream" speech continues here with "the cycle." what a day it's been. 200 speakers, thousands of people gathered in d.c. president obama is moments away from speaking on the steps of the lincoln memorial, the same spot where dr. king spoke 50 years ago. we've seen the king family ringing the bell that was saved from the birmingham baptist church where the four little girls were killed. now we have heather headley singing. we've heard john lewis, oprah, jamie foxx and two presidents so far and one more to come. what an incredibly inspiring day. the highlight, we imagine, is still ahead of us. we've heard all manner of progressives lifting us and speaking to various progressive causes, and we still have the president to come. he said his speech is not going to be as good as dr. king's speech, which we imagine is a really good thing to say, but obviously the bar is high for this president. one minute until the president speaks, as we see dr. king's memorial there. surely an exciting historic moment ahead of us. >> an
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